Aldeia Hippie de Arembepe

Walking into the small hippie village in Arembepe, located about 30 km north-east of Salvador de Bahia in northern Brazil, feels like going back in time. There are no roads, just sandy paths that get uncomfortably hot under the blazing sun; there’s no electricity, so only the stars and the moon light the way at night; and everyone who lives there identifies as a hippie.

The tiny village is lined by the cool and calm Capivara River on one side and the raging Atlantic Ocean on the other, turning it into a sort of island with diverse and spectacular views and plenty of swimming spots. The locals fish in the natural pools left between the corals at low tide, they sell handmade jewelry and crafts to the tourists who walk around the small communal market in the centre of town, and talk about poetry and music as the slow, warm breeze brings the smell of salt to the thatched-roof houses.

The town gained notoriety in the early 1970s when singer Janis Joplin travelled there after being kicked out of her Rio hotel, allegedly for swimming naked in the pool. Locals told me the small house pictured below, located  on the crest of a hill overlooking the ocean on one side and the rivers and mountains to the other, is where the legendary artist stayed. It’s said that Janis’ hit Summertime was inspired by her time in Arembepe.

Travel Galleries

My Nomadic Life: Life in Motion

life-in-motion-10-ba-2

Arriving in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil

I don’t know that I’ve ever felt like a less spontaneous person in my life than the day I found my Israeli friend unpacking his bag in our hostel in Salvador, Brazil, taking out everything he wouldn’t need for Europe but had been essential during his last year in South America. “I found a cheap ticket to Barcelona and I’m leaving tonight,” he said. I was incredulous.

I’ve met those people who can just pack up and travel to another country with only a few hours notice, but I’m not one of them. Sometimes I think I’d like to be that way, but I actually enjoy planning my travels. And although I avoid researching my destination too much–because I like to be surprised and to discover a new place my own way–I refuse to arrive somewhere I don’t know to walk around looking for a place to sleep.

life-in-motion-5-rgn-2

Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

Before I arrived in Manaus in October, 2015, I already had a clear idea of what my route and schedule would be. Sometimes I’ve wanted to change my plans, to miss my flight or just leave without a word, but I’ve only deviated a few times from the journey I planned in my mind and on maps after my first visit to the Amazon in 2012.

Because I’m travelling slowly and cheaply, with the intention of learning Portuguese and as much as I can about Brazilian culture, I’m always going to choose the cheapest ticket even if it means buying it two months in advance, and I’ll take a discounted price on accommodation even if it means committing myself to staying “long term” (ten days up to a month). Until now, I feel following my plans has taken me exactly where I need to be.

life-in-motion-6-rj-2

Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Beyond that, I honestly don’t like getting too comfortable, because when I’m comfortable I forget that one of the things I enjoy the most about this journey and my nomadic life in Brazil is movement itself. Besides, I’ve learned that discomfort leads to creativity, curiosity, and productivity, while comfort turns into complacency and the consolidation of repetitive routines.

After living in six different countries across four continents, I have not only gotten used to being uncomfortable, but I actually really enjoy it. OK, I love it. There’s nothing like arriving at a new place, unpacking, starting over, and leaving again, to do it all over. It’s almost as if I liked comfort, but not too much; almost as if I liked stability, but not really; almost as if I wanted to stay still, but not enough to actually do it.

life-in-motion-7-pa-2

Amazonas River, Pará, Brazil

With every passing year, city, country, river, and beach, my love for movement grows, and each time I move more slowly, with more time, calmly, without forcing the discoveries one can only make when living far from home. I’ve followed my whims through this parallel universe and haven’t stayed more than two months in any place; I’m always moving to a different bed, different room, hostel, city, state, latitude, beach.

At this pace, in a country as big as Brazil, I’ve inevitably spent countless hours and even days in motion: on ships and boats, buses, trains, cars, planes… With nearly 30 kg of luggage on my shoulders, I’ve walked kilometres along steep cobble-stone, dirt and asphalt streets, going up and down stairs, fighting for space at rush hour, smiling at the shocked looks from those who can’t fathom what I’m doing alone with those bags, on that road, sweating, under the sun or the rain, always with a bag of nuts or sequilhos in my hand. No one imagines I’m waiting for another bus, another train, another map to take me to my next destination, wherever that may be.

life-in-motion-9-pe-2

Leaving Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

Transport—movement—has been an inescapable part of my journey, although it’s usually discarded as a necessary though unimportant vehicle, an inescapable way to escape whatever it is I’m running from—or toward?—on this journey with no beginning and no end.

life-in-motion-4-rgn-2

Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

But it’s in those moments that a sense of adventure truly takes over me; when I’m by the side of the road waiting for a bus to pass by, or at the terminal waiting for another one to leave; when I arrive in a new city, reading the street names and looking at the little hand-drawn maps on my notepad, trying to find my place. It’s these moments when adrenaline and excitement take me to my destination despite tiredness and hunger, and desperately wanting a bathroom that’s not moving, and sleeping horizontally. It’s these moments that mark this journey which is taking me around this country-continent, and I will continue devouring maps and imagining routes until the next bus comes around.

Versión en Español
My Nomadic Life

Mi Vida Nómada: Vida en Movimiento

life-in-motion-10-ba-2

Llegando a Salvador de Bahía, Brasil

—Encontré un pasaje barato y salgo esta noche para Barcelona —me dice mi amigo de Israel una mañana en Salvador de Bahía, Brasil, mientras sacaba de su mochila todo lo que no iba a necesitar en Europa pero que fue esencial para su último año en Sur América.

Existen personas así que pueden ir de un continente a otro con sólo unas pocas horas de anticipación, pero yo no soy una de ellas. A veces pienso que me gustaría ser así, pero la verdad es que me gusta programar mis viajes, y aunque evito investigar mucho de mi destino, porque me gusta sorprenderme y descubrirlo a mí manera, rehuso llegar a un lugar que no conozco a dar vueltas buscando dónde dormir.

life-in-motion-5-rgn-2

Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil

Antes de llegar a Manaus en octubre del 2015, ya tenía una idea clara de mi ruta y horario. Y sí, a veces he querido cambiar de planes, perderme un vuelo o irme sin dar aviso, pero me he desviado muy poco del viaje que tracé en mi mente y en mapas después de mi primera visita al Amazonas en el 2012.

Para viajar lento y barato, y conocer la cultura y aprender el portugués de Brasil, siempre  escojo el pasaje más barato aunque lo tenga que comprar con dos meses de anticipación, y el descuento en alojamiento aunque tenga que comprometerme a quedarme a “largo plazo” (de diez días hasta un mes). Hasta ahora, me siento segura que mi ruta me ha llevado justo adonde necesito llegar.

life-in-motion-6-rj-2

Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

Lo que pasa también es que igual no me gusta acomodarme mucho porque cuando estoy cómoda se me olvida que una de las cosas que más me gusta de este viaje y mi vida nómada en Brasil es el movimiento en sí. Además he aprendido que la incomodidad produce creatividad, curiosidad, y productividad, mientras la comodidad se convierte en complacencia y la consolidación de rutinas repetitivas.

Después de vivir en seis países diferentes en cuatro continentes, no sólo me he acostumbrado a desacomodarme sino que me gusta. Es más, me encanta. No hay nada como llegar a un lugar nuevo, desempacar, empezar de cero, y volverme a ir, volverlo a hacer. Es casi como si me gustara la comodidad, pero no tanto; casi como si me gustara la estabilidad, pero no en serio; casi como si me quisiera quedar quieta, pero no lo suficiente para hacerlo.

life-in-motion-7-pa-2

Río Amazonas, Pará, Brasil

Con cada año que pasa, cada ciudad, país, río y playa, crece mi gusto por moverme y cada vez me muevo más despacio y con más tiempo, con calma, sin forzar los descubrimientos que sólo se hacen viviendo lejos de casa. He seguido mis caprichos por este universo paralelo por casi un año, en el cual no me he quedado más de dos meses en un solo lugar; siempre me estoy moviendo de cama, de cuarto, de hostel, de ciudad, de estado, de latitud, de playa.

A ese ritmo, y en un país tan grande como Brasil, es inevitable pasar horas y hasta días incontables en movimiento: en barcos, lanchas, buses, trenes, carros, aviones… Con mis casi 30 kg de equipaje a los hombros, he caminado kilómetros por calles empinadas, empedradas, de tierra y de asfalto, subiendo y bajando escalas, peleando por espacio en las horas pico, sonriendo ante las miradas atónitas de aquellos que no se explican qué hago sola con esas mochilas, en esa ruta, sudando, bajo el sol o la lluvia, siempre con un paquete de castañas o sequilhos en la mano. Nadie se imagina que estoy esperando otro bus, otro tren, otro mapa que me lleve al próximo destino, cualquiera que sea.

life-in-motion-9-pe-2

Saliendo de Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil

El transporte—el movimiento—ha sido un factor contundente en mi viaje, aunque muchas veces sea descartado como algo necesario pero sin trascendencia, una forma inescapable de escapar de lo que sea que estoy huyendo—¿o encontrando?—en este viaje sin comienzo ni fin.

life-in-motion-4-rgn-2

Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil

Pero son esos mismos momentos en que el sentido de aventura realmente se apodera de mí. Cuando estoy en una carretera esperando que pase el bus, o en la terminal esperando que otro salga; cuando llego a una ciudad nueva y me la paso leyendo los nombres de las calles, repasando los mapitas dibujados en mi libreta de apunte… Son esos los momentos en que la adrenalina y la emoción se encargan de llevarme hasta mi destino a pesar del cansancio y el hambre, de las ganas de un baño que no se mueva y de dormir en posición horizontal. Son esos momentos los que realmente marcan este viaje que me está llevando a conocer este país-continente. Y seguiré devorando mapas e imaginando rutas hasta que llegue el próximo bus.

Mi Vida Nómada
English Version

Mi Vida Nómada: Universos Paralelos

Entre más me acerco a los treinta, más pienso en el tiempo; en su significado; en su influencia sobre mis acciones y decisiones; en nuestra insistencia que lo podemos doblar, moldear, y ajustar a nuestros deseos; pienso en nuestra percepción de él cuando miramos atrás y cuando imaginamos el futuro.

Olinda

Olinda, Pernambuco, Brasil

Siempre estamos tratando de manipular el tiempo; lo nombramos, lo contabilizamos, como si la nomenclatura nos diera control, como si pudiéramos aprender a amaestrarlo. Esa noción de control es fundamental para nuestro entendimiento del mundo, y dicta casi todo lo que hacemos, desde los horarios para comer y dormir, hasta las edades que se espera cumplamos ciertos requisitos sociales, como el matrimonio y la maternidad. Pero yo siempre he sabido que quiero vivir en un mundo en el que el tiempo sea un concepto igual de flexible al espacio, donde las restricciones de fuerzas mayores sean respetadas mas no idolatradas, donde se valore el tiempo como la moneda más fuerte que poseemos. Entonces decidí cambiar mi mundo con el comienzo de mi aventura nómada.

Aunque el mundo ‘real’ y mi mundo nómada ocupan el mismo espacio y existen simultáneamente, en el mundo del viajero hemos renunciado a la idea del control, tratando de liberarnos de las restricciones tradicionales que pretenden dominar la naturaleza. Personas afines viven en este universo paralelo, flotando entre aventuras, durmiendo en hamacas, compartiendo música, intercambiando historias y a veces más, conociendo amigos, modificando rutas, enamorándonos, aprendiendo a despedirnos, siguiendo nuestros caprichos hedonistas hasta el próximo paraíso, todo esto sin preocuparnos por qué día de la semana sea. Muchos dirán que el nuestro es un mundo irreal y utópico, donde estamos totalmente desentendidos de las responsabilidades cotidianas, pero a nosotros nos gusta verlo como un caos controlado, un orden espontáneo, una vida sostenible llena de sorpresas que nos permite el lujo de escoger el camino que queramos seguir, y de cambiar de idea cada que nos plazca.

Morro Branco 5

Morro Branco, Ceará, Brasil

En este universo, el lunes y el jueves y el sábado son iguales que los otro cuatro días; para mí, cualquier día puede ser de descanso o de trabajo. He aprendido a no medir el tiempo según el día de la semana o del mes, sino por lo que puedo hacer en ese tiempo. Eso no significa que haya perdido toda noción del tiempo, sino que lo percibo de una manera diferente. En vez de cumplir turnos o esperar que el reloj señale la hora mágica para poder escapar la presión de actuar como si fuera posible ‘manejar’ el tiempo, me pregunto: ¿Cuánto tiempo puedo pasar en la playa? ¿Cuánto trabajo tengo que hacer antes, durante, o después? ¿Cuánto se demora el bus, cuánto tengo que caminar? ¿Cuántas cervezas me puedo tomar mientras tanto?

Parallel Universe

Maragogi, Alagoas, Brasil

Viajando, he aprendido a apreciar el tiempo; lo rápido que pasa, lo flexible que es, la cantidad de cosas que se pueden hacer con él, y lo fácil que es perderlo. En este momento, me parece imposible que hayan pasado doce meses desde mayo del año pasado—me parece que fue hace toda una vida. Y a la vez parece haber sido ayer. Me pregunto, ¿cuántas vidas he vivido en el último año? ¿Cuántas almas gemelas he conocido? ¿Cuánto he aprendido, descubierto, dejado atrás? El último año de mi vida parece existir simultáneamente en el pasado lejano y el presente; han pasado tantas cosas que tengo que dudar la veracidad del calendario, que asegura poder medir mis experiencias, cuantificarlas y convertirlas en números para que sean más fáciles de digerir.

Recife Antigo

Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil

Van pasando los meses y me doy cuenta que sólo los logro distinguir según la ciudad, las playas, y los acentos y las caras que acompañan mis memorias. Y cada vez que me muevo—me voy, vengo, vuelvo—aprendo que el tiempo rehusa ser medido o restringido, transformándose en lo que mejor le sirva a él, despreocupado por nuestros deseos o necesidades, y mucho menos por nuestros planes. Y como viajeros hemos aprendido no sólo a aceptar pero a aprovechar su rebeldía; hemos aprendido que las horas sólo importan según las mareas, y los meses sólo en grados; aprendimos a darle prioridad a los kilos, kilómetros, y milímetros de lluvia. Le damos el control no al tiempo sino a nuestra búsqueda por la adrenalina y la novedad, conscientes que el tiempo no es más que un aliado impaciente que en cualquier momento puede dejar a un lado su generosidad.

BomFim

Lagoa Bonfim, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil

Entonces sí, puede ser que estoy huyendo de algo, puede ser irresponsable vivir lejos de todo, dejando que la política y las cuentas mensuales se borren de mi memoria; de pronto nos debería importar más salir en incontables fotos con la misma ropa vieja, resaltando nuestro vestuario simple pero funcional, y nuestra reticencia a conformarnos a las tendencias de la moda o las expectativas de la sociedad que dictan cómo nos deberíamos ver, hoy en día, a nuestra edad. Pero la verdad es que andamos distraídos viviendo momentos hermosos, cumpliendo sueños, y creando memorias colectivas. Hemos forjado una comunidad de apoyo que intenta vivir de una manera sustentable, feliz, y llena, y en un mundo que parece haber perdido su camino y su identidad, hemos escogido no atarnos al tiempo, sino liberarnos con las posibilidades que nos ofrece.

English Version
Mi Vida Nómada

My Nomadic Life: Parallel Universe

As my thirtieth birthday approaches, I find myself constantly thinking about time. I think about its role in our lives, how it influences our decisions and our actions; I think about how we try to manoeuvre it, wishing it to bend to our desires; I think about our perception of it when we look back, and what we imagine it to be when we look forward.

Olinda

Olinda, Pernambuco, Brasil

We live in a world that tries to manipulate time; we name it, measure it, count it, as if nomenclature could give us control, as if we could ever master it. This notion of control is fundamental in our understanding of the world we have constructed, and it rules most of what we do, from when we eat and when we work, to when we’re supposed to hit milestones like marriage and parenting. But I’ve always known that’s not the world I want to inhabit; I love living in a world where time is a concept as flexible and untameable as space, where the constraints of forces greater than us are respected but not idolised, where time is considered our greatest asset and most valuable currency. So I changed my world by starting on an exciting nomadic journey.

Although the ‘real’ world and my nomadic world occupy the same space, and exist simultaneously, the world of the traveller is one in which time works for us rather than against us; we who inhabit it have chosen to give up control and have freed ourselves from the traditional restrictions that attempt to overpower nature. Like-minded people live in this parallel universe, floating from one adventure to the next, sleeping in hammocks, sharing music, swapping stories and sometimes more, making friends, re-routing plans, falling in love, learning to say goodbye, following our hedonistic whims to the nearest paradise, all while blissfully unaware what the day of the week it is. Many might say we’re living in an unrealistic, utopian dreamworld, detached from responsibilities, but we like to think of it as controlled chaos, spontaneous planning, a sustainable life of surprise that lets us follow whichever path we choose on any given day.

Morro Branco 5

Morro Branco, Ceará, Brasil

In this universe, Monday and Thursday and Saturday are the same as the other four days of the week; for me, any day can be a day off, any day can be a work day. We don’t gauge time by numbers on a calendar, but by what we can get done in that space of time. That doesn’t mean we disregard time altogether, but we perceive it differently. Rather than filling in slots on a roster, waiting for the clock to hit that magic number so we can run out, escape the burden of pretending to have the ability to ‘manage’ time, we strive to answer questions like: How long can I spend by the beach? How much work do I have to do before, during, or after? How long will the bus take, how far do I have to walk? How many beers can I drink in the meantime? When does my visa run out?

Maragogi

Maragogi, Alagoas, Brasil

When we travel, we learn to really appreciate time; how quickly it can move, how flexible it is, how much we can squeeze into any given hour, week, or year, and how easily it can be lost. Right now, it seems impossible to me that only twelve months have passed since last May—it honestly feels like a short lifetime ago. And yet it feels like it was just yesterday. How many lives have I lived in the past year, I wonder? How many soulmates have I met, how much have I learned, discovered, let go of? The last year of my life seems to live simultaneously in the distant past and the present; so much has happened since that I can’t help but question the veracity of the calendar’s claims to measure my experiences, to quantify them into numbers so that they’re more easily digestible.

Recife Antigo

Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil

As the months pass by, I realise I can only tell them apart by the cities, accents, faces, and beaches that are attached to my memories, and as I move—on, away, back—I learn that time refuses to be measured or constricted, morphing into whatever shape suits it best, unconcerned by our desires or needs and specially our plans. And as travellers, we have learned to not only accept but embrace its rebelliousness; we have learned that hours only matter in terms of bus schedules, months in degrees and millimetres of rain; we have learned to prioritise weight and distances. Our search for adrenaline and novelty takes over as time becomes an impatient ally who we know can choose to stop being so generous at any moment.

BomFim

Lagoa Bonfim, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil

So maybe we are running away, maybe it is irresponsible to live off the grid, allowing politics and monthly bills to become nothing more than a faraway memory; maybe we should care more about appearing in countless photographs wearing the same ragged clothes, eternally highlighting our simple but functional wardrobe and our unwillingness to conform to fashion trends or societal expectations of what we should look like, in this day and age, at our age. But we are otherwise preoccupied experiencing beautiful moments, fulfilling dreams, and creating collective memories. We have forged a supportive community that strives to live sustainably, happily, and fully, and in a world that seems to have lost its way and identity, we have chosen not to be bound by time, but rather freed by the possibilities it offers.

Versión en Español
My Nomadic Life

São Luís, Maranhão

After the Dutch invasion of the region, São Luís, the capital city of the state of Maranhão in Brazil’s north-east, was formally founded by the French in 1612 and soon after conquered by the Portuguese. The city’s rich history is palpable in its colourful buildings, its cobble-stone streets, and its cultural and ethnic diversity.

*

Después de la invasión holandesa de la región, São Luís, la capital del estado brasilero de Maranhão en el nordeste del país, fue fundada por los franceses y poco después colonizada por los portugueses. La rica historia de la ciudad palpita en sus edificios coloridos, sus calles empedradas, y su diversidad cultural y étnica.

Historical Centre / Centro Histórico

But São Luís also has a modern side to it, mostly around Ponta d’Areia, an affluent neighbourhood hugging the beautiful coastline, dotting the rebellious sand with tall buildings, restaurants, bars, and parks where families can be seen enjoying the warm weather year-round. Its priviledged location not only offers nearby beaches, but proximity to the Lençóis Maranhenses National Park, located only a few hours away via the small town of Barreirinhas.

*

Pero São Luís también tiene un lado moderno, principalmente en Ponta d’Areia, un barrio de estrato alto bordeando la costa, que ha decorado la arena rebelde con edificios altos, restaurantes, bares y parques donde se ven familias disfrutando del clima caluroso todo el año. Su ubicación privilegiada no sólo ofrece playas cercanas, sino una proximidad al Parque Nacional Lençóis Maranhenses, ubicado a unas horas de distancia, cerca al pueblo de Barreirinhas.

Ponta D’Areia
Travel / Viajes – 2015-20162011-2014

Mi Vida Nómada: Encontrando mi Libertad en la Naturaleza

Antes de llegar a Fortaleza me estaba sintiendo un poco atrapada en Barreirinhas; no me sentía en casa y me la pasaba soñando con la playa y los Lençóis Maranhenses, un parque nacional en el estado brasileño de Maranhão. El parque cuenta con 155,000 hectáreas de desierto de arenas blancas, y durante la temporada de lluvias se llenan los espacios entre las dunas, que pueden llegar a medir hasta 40 metros de altura, creando lagunas alucinantes. Tristemente, estuve allá en la temporada seca y sólo una de las lagunas tenía un poco de agua. Pero estaba determinada a ver este lugar, así fuera sin el agua, entonces decidí ir caminando desde Barreirinhas con Maduro, uno de los guías locales.

Quería conectarme con la naturaleza como lo hice en el Amazonas; quería sentir la libertad que sólo consigo haciendo ejercicio físico en un lugar natural. Estaba tan emocionada por llegar allá, que no preocupé por la ida, y ni consideré lo que realmente sería caminar hasta allá. Me desperté a las 4:15 am cuando todavía estaba oscuro y un poco frío, tomé una ducha fría para despertarme del todo, me tragué una taza de café y un pan, y a las 5:00 am Maduro y yo estábamos saliendo del pueblo.

lencois maranhenses 15

Como a las 5:20 am cruzamos el hermoso río Preguiças en un pequeño ferry, y empecé a sufrir el momento que nos bajamos al otro lado en la población de Cantinho. Las calles no están pavimentadas en Cantinho; de hecho, parecen más ríos de arena que caminos. Y como llovió en la noche la arena tenía una capa mojada encima pero seguía suelta debajo, lo que creó una capa de arena mojada que se me pegó permanentemente en los pies descalzos; además se volvía más pesada con cada paso, hundiéndome hasta los tobillos.

lencois maranhenses 20

Maduro estaba andando tranquilo entre la arena, acostumbrado a hacerlo toda su vida. A veces lo perdía de vista detrás de una curva o un arbusto, y pensaba en salir corriendo de regreso al pueblo, en rendirme, en escaparme de este esfuerzo; cuando salí en este paseo, no pensé que el camino fuera a ser tan exigente. Pero me enfoqué en las dunas de arena, en la magnitud de este lugar que iba a conocer, y mi terquedad perseveró sobre el cansancio.

Caminamos unas cuatro horas sobre la arena mojada, entre un paisaje casi desértico, rodeado de arbustos y cactus, algunos árboles de marañón, y otras plantas que producen todo tipo de frutas extrañas y deliciosas, como la jatoba y el guajiru, que me tragué mientras me insistía a mí misma que disfrutara del camino y no me preocupara cuánto tiempo nos íbamos a demorar… Pero, ¿cuánto tiempo nos vamos a demorar, Maduro? Y él sólo me respondía,—Qué, ¿está cansada?—sonreía y seguía caminando sin mucho esfuerzo.

lencois maranhenses 17

Estaba sudando tanto, que me estaba chupando mi propio sudor de la cara para rehidratarme. Bueno, atrapar el sudor con la lengua mientras lo sentía bajar hacia mi boca seguro no era más que un reflejo, pero al probar el líquido salado que caía despiadadamente por mi cara, me convencí a mí misma que probablemente era un método sostenible de rehidratación.

A un poco más de medio camino vi un puente de madera. No lo podía creer, ¡tierra firme! Traté de correr hacia el puente, hundiéndome en la arena, ciega por el sudor, emocionada por la mera posibilidad de caminar en tierra firme aunque fuera sólo un poquito. Y terminó siendo bien poquito—un poco más de 4 metros para ser exacta. Pero fue increíblemente satisfactorio, y paramos a descansar unos minutos y tomar agua (en vez de sudor) antes de seguir.

lencois maranhenses 23

Me seguía diciendo a mí misma,—Vas a sobrevivir, ni pienses en el regreso,—mientras trataba de seguirle el paso a Maduro. Y de pronto las vi: dunas tan grandes y blancas que parecían montañas cubiertas con nieve. No lo podía creer ¡habíamos llegado a los Lençóis Maranhenses! En ese momento dejé de sentir cansancio en el cuerpo, mis piernas se llenaron de energía, y mi mente estuvo libre de preocupaciones o ansiedades; lo único que quedó fue mi sonrisota que reía sin aliento.

lencois maranhenses 33 B&W

Subimos por una duna enorme que nos llevó a uno de los paisajes más increíbles que he visto en mi vida: filas interminables de dunas amarillas, blancas y naranja esculpidas entre grietas profundas donde se acumula el agua cuando llueve, y decoradas con arbustos y árboles verdes azotados por el viento. La inmensidad de este lugar me dejó sin palabras y me hizo sentir diminuta; no éramos más que punticos moviéndonos en este terreno implacable. Caminamos hacia la única laguna que tenía un poco de agua, para satisfacer la promesa de refrescarnos y descansar.

Llegamos a la pequeña Lagõa do Peixe, la laguna del pez, que tendría unos 30 cm de agua negra como mucho, pero nos metimos felizmente mientras caía una llovizna. Rodé por una duna directo al agua, y nadé entre los pecesitos. Fuera del agua, ranitas miniaturas del mismo color de la arena saltaban lejos de nosotros. Definitivamente no era lo que había visto en fotos (por favor, busca este lugar en Google), ni lo que había imaginado al ver los espacios profundos entre las dunas, donde aún se veían rastros de agua, pero fue un lugar que se robó mi corazón; los canales que se convertirán en ríos después de una lluvia fuerte me provocaban con la promesa de lagunas turquesas entre la arena blanca. Fue absolutamente espectacular.

lencois maranhenses 40

Mientras Maduro tomaba una siesta bajo un árbol, exploré las dunas con mi cámara. Después de unas horas de dar vueltas, teniendo mucho cuidado de no perder de vista la laguna, y de comer sardinas y galletas, vimos llegar un grupo de turistas en un 4×4. Tal como había planeado (pero rehusaba prometer), Maduro habló con el conductor quien acordó llevarnos de regreso al pueblo. A pesar de haber pasado una mañana lindísima en uno de los lugares más hermosos del mundo, oír la noticia que no tendría que caminar de regreso fue uno de los mejores momentos del día.

Mientras caminábamos bajo las pesadas nubes grises hacia los carros, Maduro me mira y me dice,—Va a llover…duro—. Unos 30 segundos después, se desató una tormento sobre nosotros. El viento era tan fuerte que no estaba segura si era el agua o la arena que me estaban latigueando, ¡pero dolía mucho! Estaba emparamada y tan feliz. El camino de regreso fue muy movido y las ramas de los árboles me raspaban las piernas y los brazos mientras acelerábamos entre los caminos de arena, pero aún así fue mejor que tener que caminar otra vez.

lencois maranhenses 67

Galería de Fotos
English Version
Mi Vida Nómada

My Nomadic Life: Finding Freedom in Nature

Before I reached Fortaleza, I was feeling a bit stuck in Barreirinhas, not feeling quite at home, dreaming of the beach and the Lençóis Maranhenses, a national park in Brazil’s state of Maranhão. The park is made up of 155,000 hectares of white sand desert, and during the rainy season, hallucinating lagoons fill up the spaces between the enormous dunes which can be up to 40 metres high. Sadly, I was there during the dry season and only one of the lagoons had a tiny bit of water. Determined to see this place, even without the water, I decided to walk there from Barreirinhas with one of the local guides, Maduro.

I wanted to connect with nature like I did in the Amazon; I wanted the freedom that I only seem to get from physical exercise in a natural setting. I was so excited to get there, I didn’t worry about getting there and didn’t really consider what walking there would entail when I agreed to go. I got up at 4:15 am when it was still dark and even a bit chilly, had a quick, cold shower to completely wake myself up, gulped down a huge cup of coffee and some bread, and by 5:00 am, Maduro and I were walking out of town.

lencois maranhenses 15

At about 5:20 am, we crossed the beautiful Preguiças River on a small ferry, and my struggle began as soon as we got off at the other side in Cantinho. The roads aren’t paved in Cantinho; in fact, they’re more like flowing rivers of sand than paths. And because it had rained overnight, the sand was wet on the surface but still loose underneath. This made what would already be difficult so much harder because a thick layer of sand got permanently stuck on my bare feet and grew heavier with every step, weighing me down and making me sink ankle-deep into the sand.

lencois maranhenses 20

Maduro wasn’t struggling, of course, having walked through the sand his whole life. I would lose him sometimes beyond a curve in the path, behind the shrubbery, and consider running back, giving up, escaping this endeavour that was requiring way more effort than I had originally intended to exert. But I kept my mind focused on the sand dunes, on the sheer magnitude of this place I was about to see, and my stubborn reluctance to give up persevered.

We walked for about four hours over the wet sand, surrounded by shrubs and cacti, a few caju (cashew) trees, and plants that breed all sorts of strange and delicious fruit, like the jatoba and guajiru, which I greedily gobbled up as I told myself to enjoy the journey and not worry about how long it was going to take… But, how much longer will it take, Maduro? All he’d answer was, “What, you tired?” smile, and effortlessly walk ahead.

lencois maranhenses 17

I was sweating so badly, I was licking the sweat off my own face to rehydrate. OK, catching the sweat with my tongue as it dripped down to my mouth was most likely just a reflex, but as I tasted the salty liquid that was mercilessly pouring down my face, I convinced myself it was probably a sustainable method of rehydration.

Just over half-way there, I looked up and saw a wooden bridge. I couldn’t believe it, firm land! I did my best to run toward it, sinking in the sand, blinded by the sweat, exhilarated at the thought of walking on solid ground for just a little bit. And it really ended up being a little bit—just over 4 metres to be exact. It was incredibly  satisfying, so we stopped to rest for a few minutes and drink some water (rather than sweat) before moving on.

lencois maranhenses 23

I kept telling myself, “You’ll make it, you’ll survive, don’t even think about the way back,” as I tried to keep up with Maduro. And then I saw them: dunes so big and white they looked like snow-capped mountains. I couldn’t believe it, we were there, I had made it to the Lençóis Maranhenses! At that moment, the exhaustion left my body, my legs were reenergised, my mind clear of worries or anxieties, and my smile huge and breathless.

lencois maranhenses 33 B&W

We walked up one of the big dunes which led to one of the most incredible landscapes I’ve ever seen: rows and rows of white, yellow, and orange sand dunes, carved by deep crevasses (where the water gathers when it rains) and dotted by bright green shrubs and a few wind-swept trees. The immensity of this place left me speechless and made me feel so small; we were no more than specs moving along this unforgiving terrain. We walked toward the only lagoon that had water in it, to satisfy the promise of cooling off and taking a rest.

We reached the small Lagõa do Peixe—Fish Lagoon—which might have had 30 cm of blackish water at the most, but we dove in happily as a light rain started falling. I rolled down a dune and fell straight into the water, swimming among the tiny fish. On land, miniature frogs the colour of the sand jumped almost imperceptibly away from us. It definitely wasn’t what I’d seen in the pictures (do yourself a favour and Google this place), nor what I imagined as I looked at the deep spaces between the dunes, where traces of the water were still visible, but it completely stole my heart; the channels that become rivers after a heavy rain were teasing me with the promise of turquoise lagoons amid the white sand, and it was absolutely spectacular.

lencois maranhenses 40

While Maduro took a nap under a tree, I explored the dunes with my camera. After a couple of hours of roaming around, being extremely careful to not lose sight of the lagoon, and eating some sardines and crackers, we saw a group of tourists arrive in a 4×4. Just like he’d planned (but refused to promise), he spoke to the driver who agreed to give us a ride back to town. Despite having spent an amazing morning in one of the most beautiful places in the world, hearing the news that I wouldn’t have to walk all the way back was one of the best moments of the day.

As we walked under deep, grey clouds to where the cars were packed, Maduro turned around and said, “It’s about to rain…hard.” About 30 seconds later, a storm exploded over our heads. The wind was so strong, I wasn’t sure if it was the water or the sand that was blasting against me, but it hurt! I was soaking wet and so happy. The rain slowed down by the time we got in the car and started making our way back. The ride was bumpy and branches were whipping my legs and arms as we raced through the trees, but it was still better than walking back.

lencois maranhenses 67

Photo Gallery
Versión en Español
My Nomadic Life

Mi Vida Nómada: Mi Vida Real

He estado leyendo mucho sobre la realidad detrás de algunos de los posts más populares en internet, y cómo las vidas de los blogueros de viajes particularmente son curados para conseguir más ‘likes’ y ser compartidos en las redes sociales. No se puede negar que algunos blogueros esconden la realidad de sus viajes para que sus seguidores no tengan que presenciar el aburrimiento que a veces acompaña los viajes perpetuos, como las esperas eternas en estaciones de buses y aeropuertos, los viajes incómodos en camiones y motos, y a veces, más tiempo libre de lo que uno quisiera tener.

Cotijuba Belem 5

Isla de Cotijuba, Pará

Aunque normalmente sólo subo fotos de los paisajes y ciudades que he visitado—porque son las imágenes que me llevo de cada lugar y las que quiero compartir—he tratado de mantener la veracidad de mis historias compartiendo también mi frustración durante viajes larguísimos e incómodos en barcos, o de no sentirme en casa en todos los lugares adonde llego. Hago esto porque, no sólo quiero mostrar la realidad de una Vida Nómada, sino porque simplemente estoy documentando mis viajes por Brasil; no estoy compitiendo por ‘likes’ (obviamente) ni queriendo causar envidia por la vida que he escogido vivir.

La verdad es que estoy viviendo una vida muy normal mientras viajo por Brasil, sólo que estoy cambiando de ciudad constantemente. Generalmente, mis días son bastante normales, aunque algo preocupante es con la normalidad que me preocupo por mi seguridad. Este sentido de inseguridad ha dificultado mi habilidad de fotografiar muchas de las ciudades en las que he estado, porque no es seguro andar con la cámara. Me encantaría compartir lo que veo en las calles, pero a veces lo único que puedo hacer es grabar esas imágenes en mi mente y tratar de no olvidarlas nunca; como el chico de 17 años que vi con un carrito lleno de licores al medio día al frente de una caricatura pintada en la pared, o el hombre preparando pescados frescos en un hueco de un muro naranja bajo el sol caliente de Fortaleza.

lencois maranhenses 52 B&W

Lençóis Maranhenses, Maranhão

Y así, entre imágenes y sensaciones inolvidables, la vida sigue cambiando de ritmo, moviéndose entre los colores y olores y sonidos que componen una ciudad. Las mismas cosas que formaban mi vida en Colombia forman mi vida aquí: voy a mercar, cocino, lavo, limpio, madrugo, veo películas malas, me preocupo por mi presupuesto, me pregunto cuándo voy a poder tener otra noche libre o pasar la mañana entera en la playa. La diferencia es que aquí no tengo las comodidades que hacen estas tareas más fáciles en casa.

Y claro, me la paso trabajando. Sea domingo or martes o viernes, siempre necesito estar disponible para el trabajo. Pero a pesar de las restricciones de una vida laboral normal, también tengo los privilegios de un trabajo a distancia. Hace unas semanas, por ejemplo, viajé casi 170 km al sur de Fortaleza a Canoa Quebrada, un pueblito en la costa que ha sido invadido por los franceses, los ingleses, los portugueses, y eventualmente, los hippies. La historia cuenta que un hombre de Pakistán fue quien dejó la marca más grande cuando talló una luna creciente y una estrella en los acantilados de la playa, un símbolo que hasta hoy representa el pueblo.

Canoa Quebrada

Canoa Quebrada, Ceará

Aunque trabajé todos los días que estuve allá, siempre encontré el tiempo para ir a la playa y salir en las noches a probar la comida y oler la sal en el aire. Me encantaba salir a caminar por las calles empedradas hasta la playa, nadar en las olas fuertes, y admirar la costa Atlántica desde los acantilados. Pero la mejor parte fue escaparme de la ciudad y estar más cerca a la naturaleza; me revitalizó e hizo el regreso a Fortaleza muy difícil.

Aparte de mi blog y otros proyectos en línea, también estoy haciendo intercambio de trabajo en hostales; ya terminé mi trabajo en Fortaleza, la capital del estado de Ceará, ahora estoy trabajando en un hostal en Recife, en el estado de Pernambuco, y trabajaré en otro en Natal, en el estado de Rio Grande do Norte, el próximo mes. Para cumplir con mis compromisos, sólo me pude quedar una semana en São Luís, capital del estado de Maranhão, aunque me hubiera encantado quedarme más tiempo. Y estuve trabajando tanto durante esa semana (por lo que estoy muy agradecida) que ni siquiera pude conocer mucho la ciudad ni visitar las playas. Pero a pesar de pasármela sentada en el computador trabajando, no subí ninguna foto mía así porque no me parece muy interesante, entonces entiendo cómo eso se puede interpretar como excluír parte de la historia, pero ¿de verdad preferirían verme pegada a una pantalla que una foto del mágico centro histórico de São Luís?

Sao Luis 28

São Luís, Maranhão

Yo sé que si sólo resaltara los días que paso en la playa o en la selva, sería fácil pensar que estoy viviendo una vida idílica visitando playas y ciudades de 400 años—y bueno, lo estoy haciendo—pero no es lo único que hago. La verdad es que he pasado la mayoría de los últimos dos meses sentada trabajando todo el día mientras los otros huéspedes salen a conocer, pasando sus días tomando cerveza en la playa o bailando reggae en algún bar del centro.

Pero no me estoy quejando, aunque tampoco me quejaría de tener más tiempo en la playa o caminando por las calles empedradas de ciudades centenarias construidas con azulejos portugueses. Pero esa es la realidad de Mi Vida Nómada: el trabajo es lo primero, la diversión segundo. Y la mayoría de los días estoy demasiado cansada después del trabajo para hacer otra cosa.

Canoa Quebrada

Canoa Quebrada, Ceará

Pero después pienso, si esos son mis ‘problemas’, no los cambiaría por nada. Y esa es la belleza de mi vida: no se trata sólo de viajar, conocer playas y probar comidas exóticas, sino de tener la libertad de escoger el estilo de vida que más me conviene y que me hace feliz. Pienso que eso es lo que todos deberíamos buscar—hacer lo que nos gusta de una manera sostenible. Porque aunque a mí me encanta viajar, moverme, y conocer lugares y personas nuevas, eso no es necesariamente lo que todo el mundo quiere—no es el estilo de vida para todos.

Entonces pienso que en vez de hablar del lado sofisticado del viaje (porque mi estilo de viajar realmente no es nada elegante), deberíamos cambiar la narrativa para esclarecer que nosotros (‘nómadas’) no dejamos atrás nuestras vidas estables para viajar sólo porque podemos, sino porque debemos. Y si para ti no es una necesidad, no lo hagas; si una vida nómada e incierta no es para ti, no la busques simplemente porque está de moda o porque crees que, según lo que lees en internet, es lo que deberías hacer.

Fortaleza

Fortaleza, Ceará

Creo que, a fin de cuentas, sin importar la vida que escojas, son los momentos pequeños que valen y son los que deberíamos apreciar, porque son esos preciosos segundos e imágenes que se suman para construir nuestros días y semanas y meses y años y, eventualmente, se convierten en nuestras vidas, así que deberían valer la pena. Para mí, esos pequeños momentos me hacen feliz, como caminar por la calle después de hacer alguna vuelta burocrática y ver una pared azul al frente, y darme cuenta que ¡es el Atlántico! O caminar por la playa en camino al mercado y ver una chica en patineta con una tabla de surf bajo el brazo. O hablar con personas de todas partes del mundo y saber que algo nos trajo a todos a este lugar.

Sao Luis 16

São Luís, Maranhão

Me encanta el camino que he encontrado, y me sorprendo a mí misma constantemente en este viaje con todo lo que estoy aprendiendo, como cuando tengo una conversación profunda con alguien en portugués y me doy cuenta que ya puedo expresar mis ideas claramente en este idioma. O cuando finalmente descubro cuál bus coger sin tenerle que preguntar a todo con quien me tropiezo en la calle. Así que espero que sigas este viaje a través de mis fotos e historias, y que si piensas que estoy fallando en mi manera de documentar mi viaje, ¡me lo digas!

English Version
Mi Vida Nómada

 

Belém, Pará

Belém

Belem is located at the mouth of the Tapajos (Amazon) River on Brazil’s northern Atlantic coast. Founded in 1616, Belem now has a population of around 2,100,000, making it the second most populated city in the Amazon, after Manaus.

*

Belén está ubicada en la desembocadura del río Tapajós (Amazonas) en la costa Atlántica norte de Brasil. Fundada en 1616, Belén cuenta con una población de unos 2,100,000 habitantes, convirtiéndola en la segunda ciudad más poblada de la Amazonía después de Manaus.

Theatro da Paz

The stunning Theatro da Paz (Theatre of Peace) is rivalled only by Manaus’ Teatro Amazonas; finished in 1878, it was designed by the European migrants who were looking for their fortunes in the Amazon during the rubber boom.

*

El espectacular Teatro de la Paz es comparable sólo al Teatro Amazonas de Manaus; su construcción fue terminada en 1878, y fue construido por los migrantes europeos que estaban buscando su fortuna en el Amazonas durante la bonanza del caucho.

Ilha de Cotijuba

There are 39 islands surrounding Belem, located at the mouth of the Tapajos River in the Atlantic Ocean. This is Cotijuba Island, just 45 minutes away by boat from the coast. The river is so wide, that it’s impossible to see the other shore from the white sand beaches of the island.

*

Hay 39 islas rodeando a Belén, ubicadas en la desembocadura del río Tapajos en el océano Atlántico. Esta es la isla Cotijuba, a sólo 45 minutos en barco de la costa. El río es tan ancho que es imposible ver la otra orilla desde la playa de arena blanca de la isla.

Travel / Viajes – 2015-20162011-2014